Experience Requirements Overview

  • Job Zone Five: Extensive Preparation Needed
  • Extensive skill, knowledge, and experience are needed for these occupations. Many require more than five years of experience. For example, surgeons must complete four years of college and an additional five to seven years of specialized medical training to be able to do their job.
  • Most of these occupations require graduate school. For example, they may require a master's degree, and some require a Ph.D., M.D., or J.D. (law degree).
  • Employees may need some on-the-job training, but most of these occupations assume that the person will already have the required skills, knowledge, work-related experience, and/or training.

Detailed Work Activities

  • Analyze test data or images to inform diagnosis or treatment.
  • Monitor patient progress or responses to treatments.
  • Collect medical information from patients, family members, or other medical professionals.
  • Record patient medical histories.
  • Advise patients on effects of health conditions or treatments.
  • Evaluate patient functioning, capabilities, or health.
  • Confer with other professionals to plan patient care.
  • Supervise patient care personnel.
  • Analyze patient data to determine patient needs or treatment goals.
  • Monitor patient conditions during treatments, procedures, or activities.
  • Evaluate patient outcomes to determine effectiveness of treatments.
  • Treat medical emergencies.
  • Operate on patients to treat conditions.
  • Refer patients to other healthcare practitioners or health resources.
  • Evaluate treatment options to guide medical decisions.
  • Prescribe medications.
  • Conduct diagnostic tests to determine patient health.
  • Diagnose medical conditions.
  • Order medical diagnostic or clinical tests.

Tasks

  • Analyze records, examination information, or test results to diagnose medical conditions.
  • Assess patients' pain levels or sedation requirements.
  • Collect and record patient information, such as medical history or examination results, in electronic or handwritten medical records.
  • Communicate likely outcomes of medical diseases or traumatic conditions to patients or their representatives.
  • Conduct primary patient assessments that include information from prior medical care.
  • Consult with hospitalists and other professionals, such as social workers, regarding patients' hospital admission, continued observation, transition of care, or discharge.
  • Direct and coordinate activities of nurses, assistants, specialists, residents, and other medical staff.
  • Discuss patients' treatment plans with physicians and other medical professionals.
  • Evaluate patients' vital signs or laboratory data to determine emergency intervention needs and priority of treatment.
  • Identify factors that may affect patient management, such as age, gender, barriers to communication, and underlying disease.
  • Monitor patients' conditions, and reevaluate treatments, as necessary.
  • Perform emergency resuscitations on patients.
  • Perform such medical procedures as emergent cricothyrotomy, endotracheal intubation, and emergency thoracotomy.
  • Refer patients to specialists or other practitioners.
  • Select and prescribe medications to address patient needs.
  • Select, request, perform, or interpret diagnostic procedures, such as laboratory tests, electrocardiograms, emergency ultrasounds, and radiographs.
  • Stabilize patients in critical condition.

Data Source: This page includes information from the O*NET 28.0 Database by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA). Used under the CC BY 4.0 license. O*NET® is a trademark of USDOL/ETA. This page includes Employment Projections program, Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics program, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.